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Historical Trademarks

Cracker Jack

Cracker Jack
A predecessor to what we now know as Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts was introduced at the Chicago World�s Fair in 1893 by F.W. Rueckheim and his brother Louis. Louis soon after developed the secret formula for keeping the popcorn morsels from sticking together, which is still in use today. He gave the treat to a salesman who exclaimed "That's a Cracker Jack!" which in those days was slang for something considered really great. F.W. Rueckheim had the words trademarked in 1896. The product's logo, Sailor Jack and his dog Bingo, made their marketing debut in 1918 in a burst of national pride. Having been modeled after Rueckheim's grandson, Robert, the sailor boy and his dog, with only occasional modifications to keep them up-to-date, have been the symbol for Cracker Jack ever since.

Maxwell House

Maxwell House
The story of Maxwell House Coffee begins when Joel Cheek, a traveling salesman turned coffee aficionado with the help of his friend Roger Nolley Smith, a coffee expert in his own right, developed what they thought was the perfect blend of coffee. In 1892, they approached the food buyer for the posh Maxwell House of Nashville and gave him twenty pounds of their special blend for free. With much success and compliments from patrons, the hotel bought Cheek's blend exclusively and he was quick to name his blend "Maxwell House Coffee." Legend has it that in 1907 President Theodore Roosevelt first tasted the coffee when he was a guest at the Hermitage, Andrew Jackson's home in Nashville. To his delight, he proclaimed it was "good to the last drop." Throughout the years, the blend has changed slightly, but the trademarked tilted cup and catchy slogan remain the same.

Gerber

Gerber Foods
Many have speculated the identity of the famous Gerber baby that appears on over a billion boxes and jars of Gerber food annually. According to Gerber, the company needed a trademark to symbolize their new line of baby food so they invited top artists and illustrators to submit paintings of healthy, happy babies. One of the entries, sent in by Dorothy Hope Smith, was a charcoal sketch of her neighbor�s daughter Ann Turner Cook. The portrait is now featured prominently on all Gerber product packaging along with the slogan "Babies are our business...our only business."

Michelin

Michelin
The concept of the tire man was an inspiration of the Michelin brothers when they saw tires stacked up in assorted sizes at a trade show. In 1989, with the help of a talented artist O'Galop, the Michelin Man named Bibendum was born. Throughout the years, Bibendum has evolved depending on the time period and current tire innovations. He has developed his own fun loving, jovial personality that has made him a familiar figure, and helped Michelin to be an instantly recognizable brand. In 2000, he was elected as the "Best Logo of the Century" by an international jury. Even at 107 years old, Bibendum is still changing with the times and speaking to the public on how to achieve better mobility.

Goodyear

Goodyear
The Goodyear logo dates back to August 1900 when Frank Seiberling, the founder and for many years president of The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, needed a suitable identifying symbol to represent the company. Seiberling got his inspiration from a statue of the famous god of mythology known to the ancient Romans as Mercury, that stood on the stairway post in his stately home currently known as Stan Hywet Hall. Mercury was the god of trade and commerce, as well as the fleet herald of good news. Seiberling felt the god embodied many of the characteristics for which Goodyear products were known. As a result of Seiberling's idea, the company developed a winged foot drawing that would hyphenate the Goodyear name. That logo is virtually the same as the logo that is used today.

Batman

Batman
Batman made his debut in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939 when his creators decided they wanted a hero whose goal was to purge the world of evil in urban America. The original version of the logo was a simple black bat against the grey color of the bat suit, which virtually remained unchanged for the first 25 years of the character's existence. In 1964, Detective Comics #327 introduced the Batman logo as a yellow ellipse behind the insignia in an effort to make Batman look more contemporary. This version remains the most commonly known representation of Batman. Beginning in the late 1990s and through today, Batman's suit became darker and the yellow ellipse disappeared once again to help return the character to his dark roots.

Nike

Nike
The world-renowned Nike logo found its beginnings in 1971. Phil Knight, the founder of Nike, hired one of his accounting students, Carolyn Davidson who was studying graphic design, to do freelance design work for him. She presented Knight with her swoosh design that represented an abstract wing of the Greek goddess of victory for which the company was named after. Originally disliking the swoosh, Knight, being pressed with deadlines, ended up selecting the logo but saying "I don't love it, but it will grow on me." The first shoe with the new Nike logo was introduced in the spring of 1972. The swoosh logo, together with the "Just Do It" slogan, have become synonymous with expressing the essence of the Nike brand and its philosophy.

Bicycle

Bicycle Playing Cards
Easily the most popular playing cards in the U.S., Bicycle Playing Cards' origins date back to 1885 when The United States Playing Card Company produced a new playing card deck that needed a name. A worker at the company named Gus Berens suggested naming them after the current technological marvel, the bicycle. With that, the brand Bicycle was created. The pictures on the Bicycle playing cards have remained almost the same since the first deck was been printed. At the same time, an acute observer can see those subtle changes, which make Bicycle Playing Cards unique.

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